logo
Energy information for Australian households
18 February 2016

Australian households spend $47 billion on energy, including $16 billion on electricity and $25 billion on petroleum products such as petrol and diesel, according to figures released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS)

“Between 2008-09 and 2013-14 Australian households spent more on energy than either mining, manufacturing or service industries did,” said Steven May, ABS Director of the Centre of Environment Statistics.

“Average energy use by households has decreased over the same time by 1 per cent.

“More productive use of energy is also occurring across the board with industry. 

“Energy intensity (the energy consumed to produce one unit of economic output) has levelled off after four years of decreases.

“Decreases in manufacturing, transport and mining were offset by increases in agriculture, construction and services.

“Total renewable energy sources are still quite small at 2 per cent of total supply, although these were increasing rapidly between 2012-13 and 2013-14.

“In terms of our energy assets, we have approximately 660 years of brown coal, 230 years of uranium and 10 years of crude oil left under current production capacity. This of course doesn’t take into account new discoveries,” said Mr May.

Today’s figures are part of the ABS environmental accounts program which produces integrated energy supply and use tables in physical and monetary terms. The program is also used in the production of the Australian National Accounts. 

http://www.finder.com.au/aussie-households-spent-more-on-energy-than-mining-industry

We’re consuming less, yet households spend more money on energy than industry sectors do, according to figures released recently by the Australian Bureau of Statistics. 

New figures show that Australian households spend $47 billion on energy, including $16 billion on electricity and $25 billion on petroleum products such as petrol and diesel. 

“Between 2008-09 and 2013-14 Australian households spent more on energy than the mining, manufacturing or service industries did”, ABS Director of the Centre of Environment Statistics Steven May observed, adding that average energy use by households decreased by 1 per cent over the same period. 

Total renewable energy sources are still quite small at 2 per cent of total supply, although these were increasing rapidly between 2012-13 and 2013-14. 

“In terms of our energy assets, we have approximately 660 years of brown coal, 230 years of uranium and 10 years of crude oil left under current production capacity. This of course doesn’t take into account new discoveries,” May said. 

More reason to invest now in alternative, sustainable energy sources such as solar panels on our roofs?

Investing in sustainable energy resources is the way of the future if recent Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) information is anything to go by. According to ABS Director of the Centre of Environment Statistics, Steven May, Australian households spent more on energy than mining, manufacturing or service industries did between 2008-09 and 2013-14.

Recently released ABS figures show that Australian households spend $47 billion on energy, including $16 billion on electricity and $25 billion on petroleum products such as petrol and diesel. Surprisingly though average energy use by households has decreased over the same time by 1 per cent.

Decreases in manufacturing, transport and mining were offset by increases in agriculture, construction and services. ABS Director May also  said that the “average energy use by households has decreased over the same time by 1 per cent.

“More productive use of energy is also occurring across the board with industry. 

“Energy intensity (the energy consumed to produce one unit of economic output) has levelled off after four years of decreases.

“Total renewable energy sources are still quite small at 2 per cent of total supply, although these were increasing rapidly between 2012-13 and 2013-14.

“In terms of our energy assets, we have approximately 660 years of brown coal, 230 years of uranium and 10 years of crude oil left under current production capacity. This of course doesn’t take into account new discoveries,” said Mr May.





Facebook Comments